KH&LA is keeping an eye on the following issues as the General Assembly meets in Frankfort:

1% Transient Room Tax - in the last General Assembly, $9M was swept into the general fund budget. The contention of KH&LA is that the revenue from the 1% Transient Room Tax should be used for its intended purpose of tourism marketing.

AirBnB - the hotel community believes that AirBnB's should be held to the same standards as hotels, in terms of tax collection, health inspections, insurance, etc.

Minimum Wage Regulations - KH&LA is watching minimum wage regulations throughout the state. Our contention is that the wage should be consistent throughout the state, not a patchwork of different wages in different jurisdictions.
 

 

April 18, 2016

KH&LA Weekly Report from our State Capitol: The 2016 General Assembly ended with a Bang rather than a Whimper. Lawmakers reached a budget agreement during the veto recess and where off to the races on the final day allowed by the state constitution.

A large number of bills passed, although a bunch were "gutted” out and new language inserted. The sponsors of these bills were not able to recognize them when they returned to the house of origin.

Of interest to hoteliers, the Lexington/Fayette County transient room tax will be boosted by 2.5% to refurbish and expand the Lexington Center facility. This is the same proposal that was shot down last year when there was an attempt to graft language on to redirect part of the funds to support the Kentucky Horse Park.

The budget that was adopted devotes a great deal of money to shoring up the underfunded state pension system. Governor Bevin has been holding firm on his commitment to a fiscally conservative budget for the state and prevailed. The administration has stated repeatedly that they will not "sweep” funds from accounts that are designated for a single purpose. This should ensure that state transient room taxes actually go to Tourism promotion, not simply being thrown into the General Fund.

KHLA continues to press on the equal enforcement of the State Hotel Code for AirBnB facilities. The state has been attempting to reach an agreement with AirBnB with regard to collection of the transient room tax but we are told that negotiations have broken down. KHLA has registered insistence that any transient tax remittance include the address of the facility collecting the tax. This will enable state regulators to inspect and license each of the facilities, as is required of other lodging facilities.

And finally, the Bevin administration is committed to removing burdensome regulations from the backs of business and industry. We are already seeing this in action as industries bring problems forward. If there are particularly troublesome regulations that the industry is dealing with, please bring them to the KHLA board.
 

 

April 11, 2016

KH&LA Weekly Report from our State Capitol: The KHLA legislative agents held a follow up meeting with the Kentucky Department of Travel and Tourism to discuss areas of concern for the hospitality to seek areas where they both can work together. The Cabinet, in cooperation with the Department of Revenue, is beginning negotiations with AirBnB for the collection of state and local transient room taxes on each room night booked through their system.

While this is a step forward, KHLA’s lobbyists drew the Department’s attention to KRS 219.011 through 219.081. These are the statutes containing the State Hotel Code and the requirements for annual permits, etc. KRS219.011 (3) defines "Hotel” as "every building or structure kept, used, maintained, advertised, or held out to the public as a place where sleeping accommodations are furnished to the public, and includes motels, tourist homes and similar establishments, but excludes boarding houses and rooming houses.”

KHLA explained its contention that facilities that rent accommodations through an online transient lodging system meet the definition of "Hotel” and should be regulated as such. The Hotel statutes are administered by the Cabinet for Health and Family Services. The chapter also includes a requirement that the State Fire Marshal enforce all applicable building codes applied to "Hotels.” That will bring in the Cabinet for Public Protection as well.

We will continue to make the case to state agencies that the law requires that all lodging facilities should be on a level playing field and it this their responsibility to ensure the safety of the public.

The Kentucky General Assembly will end its 2016 Session this week, one way or another. Hopes are still being held that a budget deal can be worked out between the House and Senate. All discussions are being held behind closed doors and we will just have to wait and see.
 

 

April 4, 2016

KH&LA Weekly Report from our State Capitol: Another Session…another budget standoff. Day 59 of the 60 day Session passed with no budget compromise between the House and Senate. That being said, our sources tell us that negotiations have still been going on behind the scenes and there is still a quiet hope that a budget resolution will be reached on April 12th, the last day of the 2016 regular Session. What does it mean if there is no budget? State Government essential services will NOT shut down. Law enforcement will continue, Prisons will be manned and education funds will continue to flow to schools and universities. Some agencies will be required to curtail operations and the public will feel some pain. State parks will close to the public with only a minimum of maintenance work allowed to continue. Governor Bevin will have an option to call a Special Session of the General Assembly or to use his Executive authority to continue operations at the diminished level. Special Sessions present interesting differences from a Regular Session. Only the Governor can call the General Assembly into a Special Session. He also is the only one that can specify what issues will be addressed under his "Call.” But unlike a Regular Session, there is no time limit on how long they can meet. They can stay in Session for as little as one day or indefinitely. The public will have little patience with any of these scenarios. With all 100 members of the House and 19 members of the State Senate up for election in 2016, a prolonged standoff will not help any political scenario.

For the most part, bills have been separated between the living and the dead. While there is still one day left for passage of legislation on April 12th, a bill would have to make a heroic final stand to be passed into law.

Here is a summary of bills of interest:

HB2 Local Option Sales Tax – Speaker Stumbo’s bill limped out of the House again this year with little momentum to move forward. This bill once again is dead.

HB278 Minimum Wage Increase – Also Speaker Stumbo’s bill and also scraped out of House after major watering down. Definitely dead.

HB441 Transient Room Tax (Lexington) Representative Ruth Ann Palumbo’s bill to allow Lexington to raise its room tax to support renovation of Rupp Arena and the Lexington Center appears is Dead. Some of the cause may likely be found in the combatants for the US Senate race this fall.

HB 477 – Misclassification of Employees – Representative Sannie Overly tries again with her bill that would essentially presume that all workers are employees and place paperwork burdens and potential penalties for those hiring subcontractors. Really, really dead.

HB546 Limiting Application of Transient Room Tax – Representative Kevin Sinnette introduced this bill that would stop the collection of transient room tax on stays of more than 30 days. Dead.

SB11 - Bourbon Trail/Alcohol bill – The bill to expand options for tourism with Bourbon distilleries, craft breweries and farm wineries has reached the Governor’s desk and will be signed into law.

SB 50 School Calendar – Senator Chris Girdler’s bill to mandate that school years not begin until after Labor Day came out of the Senate, but has come to a halt in the House Education Committee. The school day is over for this bill. Dead.

SB116 Restaurant Tax – Senator Jared Carpenter’s attempt to allow cities of all sizes to levy a restaurant tax has crashed and burned in the Senate Appropriations and Revenue Committee.Still very dead.

SB 298 Expungement Bill – Senator Stivers has proposed a bill to remove felony convictions for low class felonies. This "second chance” bill is much more restrictive than previous introductions. Language has been transferred into a "gutted out” HB 40. SB40, which limits the types of felonies that can be expunged, requires a 5 year waiting period and requires a $500 application fee has cleared both Chambers and will be signed by the Governor.

And I know that you have been waiting for this update…the landmark bill to make it legal to braid hair without a beauticians’ license has passed both Chambers and gone to the Governor for signature. The Commonwealth advances.
 

 

March 25, 2016

With only 4 days to go in the 2016 General Assembly Session, the legislators are working to finalize the two year state funding plan. KHLA has reached out to the new administration and has established a great relationship with Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet Secretary Don Parkinson. Secretary Parkinson recently met with KHLA Leadership and discussed opportunities for cooperation in bolstering hospitality and tourism for the Commonwealth. Secretary Parkinson has never worked in state government and brings a strong and impressive background in private sector marketing experience. He shared with the group that the City of Gatlinburg has a larger marketing budget than the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Many areas of common concern were discussed including ensuring that transient room taxes are properly collected and expended for their intended purposes. Parkinson assured the group that his Cabinet was focused on a fair collection from all lodging sectors and using the funds to invest in tourism expansion, not sweeping to the General Fund budget. All participants expressed their interest in an ongoing collaboration.

The meeting was held at the Kentucky Headquarters of Beam Suntory in Louisville. Coincidently, word arrived that the Public Private Partnership Bill (also known as P3) had passed the General Assembly and was on the way to the Governor for signature. Public Private Partnerships are seen as one of the only paths available for the state park system and other projects. The group toured the Beam Urban Still House and toasted the legislative victory.

Last week we told you that the special elections has let off some of the pressure and things were more cordial. Scratch that. Open hostility broke out in several areas including: chKHLA is already looking ahead to coming legislative challenges. One in particular is the Governor’s plan to tackle restructuring of the entire Kentucky Tax Code in 2017. KHLA members are encouraged to meet their local officials and develop relationships.

Here is a summary of bills of interest:

HB2 Local Option Sales Tax – Speaker Stumbo’s bill limped out of the House again this year with little momentum to move forward. Will likely die in the Senate.

HB278 Minimum Wage Increate – Also Speaker Stumbo’s bill and also scraped out of House after major watering down. Also will likely die in the Senate.

HB441 Transient Room Tax (Lexington) Representative Ruth Ann Palumbo’s bill to allow Lexington to raise its room tax to support renovation of Rupp Arena and the Lexington Center appears to be stalled. It passed the House and has been sitting in the Senate Appropriations and Revenue Committee, awaiting action as part of the Senate budget process.

HB 477 – Misclassification of Employees – Representative Sannie Overly tries again with her bill that would essentially presume that all workers are employees and place paperwork burdens and potential penalties for those hiring subcontractors. Bill barely passed to the Senate, but dead for all intents and purposes.

HB546 Limiting Application of Transient Room Tax – Representative Kevin Sinnette introduced this bill that would stop the collection of transient room tax on stays of more than 30 days. Dead.

SB11 - Bourbon Trail/Alcohol bill – Senator John Schickel’s bill came out of the House Licensing and Occupations Committee. It is expected to be voted on March 28th. SB 50 School Calendar – Senator Chris Girdler’s bill to mandate that school years not begin until after Labor Day came out of the Senate, but has come to a halt in the House Education Committee. Likely Dead

SB116 Restaurant Tax – Senator Jared Carpenter’s attempt to allow cities of all sizes to levy a restaurant tax has crashed and burned in the Senate Appropriations and Revenue Committee. Definitely Dead on Arrival

SB 298 Expungement Bill – Senator Stivers has proposed a bill to remove felony convictions for low class felonies. This "second chance” bill is much more restrictive than previous introductions. Language has been transferred into a "gutted out” HB 40. Will likely pass Senate but there is still opposition.

And finally…the bill to make it legal to braid hair without a beauticians’ license is poised to pass the House and go to the Governor for signature.
 

 

March 21, 2016

With only 9 days to go in the 2016 General Assembly Session, the pace is picking up and dying bills are being pushed out of the way.  The big work this week will be in the Senate Appropriations & Revenue Committee.  Senate Leaders worked throughout the weekend creating the Senate version of the state budget.  The bill will appear publicly today or tomorrow and will be voted on Tuesday or Wednesday.  This is one of the shortest number of days that the Senate has ever had to consider the budget after receiving it from the House.   After it is voted, the House will reject the Senate proposal (likely without reading it) and conference committee members will be appointed by each chamber.  This is where the real haggling will take place as both chambers attempt to stake their claim to state funds and political opportunities.   These negotiations, behind closed doors, is where you can be made or broken.    The real wild card is Governor Bevin and how far he will go with his "line item” Veto pen.  

Last week we told you that the special elections has let off some of the pressure and things were more cordial.  Scratch that.  Open hostility broke out in several areas including: chamber floors; protocol slights in committee; retaliation in another committee for the protocol slights in the first committee; bills being held "hostage” in each chamber to force the other to release bills.  So…we are back to normal.

Here is a summary of bills of interest:

HB2 Local Option Sales Tax – Speaker Stumbo’s bill limped out of the House again this year with little momentum to move forward.  Will likely die in the Senate.

HB278 Minimum Wage Increate – Also Speaker Stumbo’s bill and also scraped out of House after major watering down.  Also will likely die in the Senate.

HB441 Transient Room Tax (Lexington) Representative Ruth Ann Palumbo’s bill to allow Lexington to raise its room tax to support renovation of Rupp Arena and the Lexington Center is progressing.  It passed the House and has been sitting in the Senate Appropriations & Revenue Committee, awaiting action as part of the Senate budget process.

HB 477 – Misclassification of Employees – Representative Sannie Overly tries again with her bill that would essentially presume that all workers are employees and place paperwork burdens and potential penalties for those hiring subcontractors.  Bill is on House Floor, but dead for all intents and purposes.

HB546 Limiting Application of Transient Room Tax – Representative Kevin Sinnette introduced this bill that would stop the collection of transient room tax on stays of more than 30 days.  Dead.

SB11  - Bourbon Trail/Alcohol bill – Senator John Schickel’s bill is still resting in the House Licensing & Occupations Committee.  The subject of horse trading between leadership, some portions of the bill will likely be heard in committee this week.   Likely not to be nearly as comprehensive.

SB 50 School Calendar – Senator Chris Girdler’s bill to mandate that school years not begin until after Labor Day came out of the Senate, but has come to a halt in the House Education Committee.  Likely Dead

SB116  Restaurant Tax – Senator Jared Carpenter’s attempt to allow cities of all sizes to levy a restaurant tax has crashed and burned in the Senate Appropriations & Revenue Committee.  Definitely Dead on Arrival

SB 298 Expungement Bill – Senator Stivers has proposed a bill to remove felony convictions for low class felonies.  This "second chance” bill is much more restrictive than previous introductions.  Language has been transferred into a "gutted out” HB 40. Will likely pass Senate but there is still opposition.
 

A couple of quick updates:  The bill to make it illegal to declaw your own cat made it out of committee to the House Floor.  There it shall rest.  The bill to study changing to law to allow Kentuckians to own monkeys, passed out of committee but made a U Turn back into committee for certain death.  A glimmer of sanity was seen.

Other bills of interest, click here.

 

 

 

March 14, 2016

The Special legislative elections did not turn out as the Republicans had hoped.  Projected to win at least three of the four races, the Republicans ended up -1, winning only one race.  The House now stands at D-53 R-47.  Here are the winners of the four races:

 

Jeff Taylor (D), 8th District, Christian & Trigg Counties

Daniel Elliott (R), 54th District, Boyle & Casey Counties

Chuck Tackett (D), 62nd District, Fayette, Owen & Scott Counties

Lew Nicholls (D), 98th District, Boyd & Greenup Counties

The elections had the effect of a pressure relief valve.  Tensions in the House dropped dramatically as everyone knows where they stand and there is no threat of a Republican coup before the November elections. With only 13 days remaining in the 60 day Session, the pace is expected to speed up.

The House will show the world its version of the budget on Tuesday, right after the new House members are sworn in.  It will shoot directly to the floor and lawmakers will have only an hour or so to review it.  This avoids any attempts to amend the bill as they must be filed 24 hours in advance. Neat trick, huh?

Here is a summary of bills of interest:

HB2 Local Option Sales Tax – Speaker Stumbo’s bill limped out of the House again this year with little momentum to move forward.  Will likely die in the Senate.

HB278 Minimum Wage Increate – Also Speaker Stumbo’s bill and also scraped out of House after major watering down.  Also will likely die in the Senate.

HB441 Transient Room Tax (Lexington) Representative Ruth Ann Palumbo’s bill to allow Lexington to raise its room tax to support renovation of Rupp Arena and the Lexington Center is progressing.  It passed the House and has been sitting in the Senate Appropriations & Revenue Committee, awaiting the arrival of the budget from the House.

HB 477 – Misclassification of Employees – Representative Sannie Overly tries again with her bill that would essentially presume that all workers are employees and place paperwork burdens and potential penalties for those hiring subcontractors.  Bill is on House Floor, but has little chance of becoming law.

HB546 Limiting Application of Transient Room Tax – Representative Kevin Sinnette introduced this bill that would stop the collection of transient room tax on stays of more than 30 days.  Dead.

SB11  - Bourbon Trail/Alcohol bill – Senator John Schickel’s bill is still resting in the House Licensing & Occupations Committee. The subject of horse trading between leadership, some portions of the bill will likely be heard in committee this week. 

SB 50 School Calendar – Senator Chris Girdler’s bill to mandate that school years not begin until after Labor Day came out of the Senate, but has come to a halt in the House Education Committee.  Opposed by the schools, its prospects are dim.

SB116  Restaurant Tax – Senator Jared Carpenter’s attempt to allow cities of all sizes to levy a restaurant tax has crashed and burned in the Senate Appropriations & Revenue Committee.

SB 298 Expungement Bill – Senator Stivers has proposed a bill to remove felony convictions for low class felonies.  This "second chance” bill is much more restrictive than previous introductions. Will likely pass Senate. 

And finally….we have two late entrants in the wackiest bill competition. 

HR 238 was filed by Rep. Tim Moore on Friday.  This landmark legislation would declare Clarkson, Kentucky to be the Honey Bee Capital of Kentucky. 

Not to be outdone, Rep. Tom McKee and Rep. Wilson Stone tag teamed to introduce HR 236.  This gem would require the Interim Joint Committee on Agriculture to spend the summer studying the possibility of making monkey ownership legal in Kentucky.

Other bills of interest, click here.


March 7, 2016

Kentucky’s first (and probably only) Republican Presidential Caucus is now behind us. The unanticipated size of the turnout caused chaos and frustration at a number of voting sites. However, this does point out the energy among the electorate. Pundits are noting the extreme unrest among voters of all types. Tuesday, March 8th will be the turning point for the 2016 General Assembly and a barometer for the cry for "change.” Two of the four elections are to be held in what were considered reliably Democratic districts and the other two in regular Republican voting areas. Should the tide swing one way of the other, the dynamics of Kentucky’s politics could be in for a seismic shift.

We have now passed the deadline for filing of new House or Senate bills. While close to 1,000 pieces of legislation have been filed, a vast portion are already dead. Interestingly, almost 100 "mule” bills have been introduced. "Mules” are bill shells that do things like "change to gender neutral language.” As with the mule animal, these bills are designed to "pack” other language in the form of amendments. Every one of them is dangerous and could morph at any time.

We also have now finished judging of our Annual "You Have Got To Be Kidding Me” Wackiest Bill Contest for 2016. Here are the top three finishers:

#3 HB565 – An Act Relating to Christmas – The bill makes it unlawful for an employee to be fired for wishing a customer "Merry Christmas.” Earthshattering legislation.

#2 SB269 – An Act Relating to Hair Braiding – This bill would create a special exemption from the Hairdressers’ license for businesses that do hair extensions (with both real or synthetic hair), braiding and beading of hair. I can’t make this up.

And #1 without any doubt…HB556 – An Act relating to Cat Declawing. The bill would prohibit anyone other than a licensed veterinarian from declawing cats. I have never met anyone that thought that a good time on Saturday night was declawing the cat, but obviously this is a lot bigger problem than I realized.
Other bills of interest...click here.


February 29, 2016

Leap Year Day, February 29th, bring us to the 37thDay of the 60 Day Session.  Tuesday March 1st is the last day to file House Bills and Thursday, March 3rdis the last day to file Senate Bills.While that narrows one area for new legislation, the far wider area of amendment season opens up.Amendments can be added to any related bill at any point in the process.This becomes especially rampant in the last twenty days of the Session.

The Session continues a laggardly pace during the run up to the March 8th Special Elections. Very little activity has been seen both in committees and in the Chambers.Many committees have met only once or twice since the beginning of the year and others have heard only one or two inconsequential bills as time is frittered away.The House continues a plodding series of hearings on the state budget, while the Senate continues to push for a speedier House vote.  Speaker Greg Stumbo has said that the Senate can expect the House version of the budget on March 16th, the 49th day of the Session.

Tuesday, February 23rd was the Annual Kentucky Small Business Caucus Breakfast at the Mansion. Business leaders from across the state joined together to network, discuss issues and hear about future directions.This year Governor Matt Bevin was the keynote speaker.He reviewed his concerns about the financial state of the Commonwealth and voiced his intention to focus his administration on improving the business climate.KH&LA’s Don Howard attended on behalf of the hospitality industry.Other speakers included Phillip Pratt, Republican candidate in the 62nd District special election and Tom Underwood.


February 22, 2016

Monday, February 22 marks the 32nd day of the 60-day Session.

The major issue at hand is the 2016-18 budget, HB 303. Senate Leadership has called for the House to expedite its version of the budget to get to negotiations between the chambers. Governor Bevin’s initial budget proposal called for drastic budget reductions to shift funds into the beleaguered pension system. Currently the state pensions are funded at approximately 17% of the needed principle, making Kentucky the second worst funded pension system in the country. House Democratic Leadership is decrying the cuts, particularly to higher education. While Senate President Stivers has asked that the House deliver its version of the budget by the end of February, Speaker Stumbo holds to a schedule of March 15th for a floor vote. It is no coincidence that the schedule falls after the four special elections to be held on March 8th. Currently House Democrats hold a margin of 50-46. A sweep of the four elections by Republicans could bring a 50-50 split. A recent development also plays into the mix. Democratic Representative Tom McKee recently had an emergency triple bypass heart surgery. His return during the remainder of the Session is questionable, leaving the Democratic voting bloc at 49.

Senate Bill 11, the Tourism bill for wineries, breweries and distilleries has stalled in the House. Recently the Distilleries filed House Bill 433, dealing only with issues related to expansion of Bourbon Trail offerings. The bill has almost forty bi-partisan co-sponsors in the House.

 

Recently a spokesman for the Kentucky Department of Tourism, Arts & Heritage told WHAS 840 radio that they are looking forward to passage of the pending Public-Private Partnership bill, also known as P3. Under the legislation, state government could enter an agreement with private investors to build and operate public facilities. The interviewed official stated that the Cabinet was very much interested in entering into such agreements for investment in and operation of a variety of state resort parks. This was the first public signal that the administration will be open to proposals and agreements with regard to parks.

If you have not used the new and improved KY Legislative Website, please go to http://www.lrc.ky.gov.

On this website, you can click on Who’s My Legislator, type in your address and your State Representative and State Senator will be listed as well as all contact information. If you would like to receive The Rotunda Group Daily Update, send an email to Kelley@therotundagroup.com.

Other bills of interest...click here.


February 15, 2016

Monday, February 15 is President’s Day and a Legislative Holiday. The General Assembly will reconvene on Tuesday, February 16 for the 28thday of the 60 day Session.

The biggest impact is from the upcoming Special Elections.  As the Democrats struggle to maintain control of the House, fundraising has swung decidedly in favor of the Republican candidates.  There are four districts with elections scheduled for March 8th.   Outside PACs are also gearing up with the majority of funds poised to help the Republicans.  The state parties are at an even more glaring disparity.  The Republicans hold 10 times the ready campaign cash, with approximately $1Million available to less than $100,000 reported by the Democratic Party. Should the Republicans sweep the elections, a 50-50 balance of power would place the House in uncharted territory.  

The most interesting sideshow this week boiled up between former Governor Steve Beshear and Governor Matt Bevin.  Beshear is gearing up an organization to save his KyNect health insurance exchange.  Bevin has already begun winding down its operations.  In apparent retaliation, the Senate had a series of floor speeches about the need to economize and delete "luxuries” from the state portfolio.  The target is the Kentucky Horse Park.  Long a money loser for the state, it is a pet project of former First Lady Jane Beshear.  The speeches focused on the need to save the Pension funds that grossly underfunded. This  will likely be just the beginning of both this battle and a potential future for a number of State Parks.

If you have not used the new and improved KY Legislative Website, please go to http://www.lrc.ky.gov

 On this website, you can click on Who’s My Legislator, type in your address and your State Representative and State Senator will be listed as well as all contact information.  This website is provided with your tax dollars, make sure you get a return on your money!

SB 11, the alcohol beverage bill previously reported on, is not moving at this time, so a phone call next week could give it a push and we will certainly send an ACTION ALERT when a major push is needed.  Currently each chamber is focusing on sending their bills "across” to the other Chamber. If you have any questions or concerns with SB 11, please let us know.

The Governor continues his pledge to end sweeping of special fund accounts.  As the House continues work on their version of his budget, we will see what fate brings there.

For additional bills that are being tracked by KH&LA, click here.


February 8, 2016

Monday, February 8 was Day 23 of the 60 Session.
 

The filing Deadline for candidates has passed.  The Governor’s Budget has been delivered and the Appropriations & Revenue Budget Subcommittee’s have begun the process of hearings on the Governor’s Budget.  A Power Point of the Tourism Cabinet’s Budget has been provided to you.

Four special elections that have been called for March 8th loom over the actions of The House of Representatives. If the Republicans win all four of the special elections, the House would be tied 50-50.  The current make-up of the House is 50-46.

This week saw the first abortion bill passed by both chambers and signed into law by the Governor.

The House has soundly rejected Senate bills to revise Prevailing Wage and Right to Work. 

Monday, February 15th is President’s Day and is a Legislative Holiday.

The last day for new House Bills is February 29 and the last day for new Senate Bills is March 2.  The Rotunda Group (TRG) is watching for any Bill that supports or negatively impacts the work of our Association members.  For a detail of Legislation tracked by TRG and the status of the Bills please see the attached customized report for KH&LA.

Currently, there is only one Bill we would encourage you to let your State Representatives know that you support and that is SB11, Alcoholic Beverages.  It is a positive Bill supporting tourism.  Please pay close attention to the COMMENT section below each Bill.  These COMMENTS are intended for your use and understanding of the Bill status.

If you have not used the new and improved KY Legislative Website, please go to http://www.lrc.ky.gov

On this website, you can click on Who’s My Legislator, type in your address and your State Representative and State Senator will be listed as well as all contact information.  This website is provided with your tax dollars, make sure you get a return on your money!

SB 11 is not moving at this time, so a phone call next week could give it a push and we will certainly send an ACTION ALERT when a major push is needed.  If you have any questions or concerns with SB 11, please let us know.

Sweeping the tourism bank account of the 1% tax is off the table for now…we will track daily!

Previous bill tracker reports:

February 29, 2016

February 22, 2016

February 15, 2016

February 8, 2016

January 25, 2016

January 15, 2016

January 11, 2016